Saturday, 10 September 2016

Matins readings for the second Sunday of September



Nocturn I: Job 9:1-17

Reading 1: And Job answered, and said: Indeed I know it is so, and that man cannot be justified compared with If he will contend with him, he cannot answer him one for a thousand. He is wise in heart, and mighty in strength: who hath resisted him, and hath had peace Who hath removed mountains, and they whom he overthrew in his wrath, knew it not.

R. What shall we receive good at the hand of God, and shall we not receive evil?
* The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away. As the Lord hath pleased, so hath it befallen. Blessed be the Name of the Lord.
V. Naked came I out of my mother's womb, and naked shall I return thither.
R. The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away. As the Lord hath pleased, so hath it befallen. Blessed be the Name of the Lord.

Reading 2: Who shaketh the earth out of her place, and the pillars thereof tremble. Who commandeth tile sun and it riseth not: and shutteth up the stars as it were under a seal:Who alone spreadeth out the heavens, and walketh upon the waves of the sea. Who maketh Arcturus, and Orion, and Hyades, and the inner parts of the south.

R. My sighing cometh before I eat, and my roarings are poured out like the waters, for the thing which I greatly feared is come upon me, and that which I was afraid of is come unto me. Was not I silent Held not I my peace Was not I at rest* And trouble came.
V. Behold, I cannot help myself, and they that were needful unto me have forsaken me.
R. And trouble came.

Reading 3: Who doth things great and incomprehensible, and wonderful, of which there is no number.  If he come to me, I shall not see him: if he depart I shall not understand. If he examine on a sudden, who shall answer him? or who can say: Why dost thou so? God, whose wrath no mall can resist, and under whom they stoop that bear up the world.

R. Why do ye argue against the words of truth? Do ye imagine words to reprove me and strive to confound one that is your friend* Nevertheless, finish that ye have in mind.
V. Judge that which is just, and ye shall find no iniquity in my tongue.
R. Nevertheless, finish that ye have in mind.

Reading 4: What am I then, that I should answer him, and have words with him? I, who although I should have any just thing, would not answer, but would make supplication to my judge. And if he should hear me when I call, I should not believe that he had heard my voice.  For he shall crush me in a whirlwind, and multiply my wounds even without cause.

R. My harp is turned to mourning, and my organ into the voice of them that weep.* Let me alone, O Lord, for my days are vanity.
V. My skin is black upon me, and my bones are burned with heat.
R. Let me alone, O Lord, for my days are vanity.
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. Let me alone, O Lord, for my days are vanity.

Nocturn II: St Gregory, Book of Morals

Reading 5: We know that it is so of a truth, and that a man cannot be justified as against God. When God is put out of the consideration, a man may be considered to be just, but considered as against God, his righteousness vanisheth away. When a man measureth himself by his relation to Him, Who is the Author of all good, he doth thereby acknowledge that of himself he hath no good in him, but hath received from God whatsoever he hath. He that glorifieth himself because of good which hath been given him, fighteth against God with God's own gifts. It is just therefore that the grounds upon which he ought to have been humbled, but upon which he hath puffed himself up, should be used to humble his vain-glory.

R. My flesh is clothed with worms and clods of dust. My skin is dry and drawn together.
* Remember me, O Lord, for my life is wind.
V. My days are swifter than a weaver's shuttle, and are spent without hope.
R. Remember me, Lord, for my life is wind.

Reading 6: But an holy man, because he perceiveth that the worth of our own good deeds falleth short, when he considereth his own spiritual man, justly saith If He will contend with him, he cannot answer Him one of a thousand.

R. My days are few, and in a short while they will be ended. Let me alone, then, O Lord that I may bewail my sorrow a little
* Before I go to the land of darkness and of the shadow of death.
V. thine hands, O Lord have made me, and fashioned me together round about, and yet dost Thou forthwith destroy me
R. Before I go to the land of darkness and of the shadow of death.

Reading 7: In the Holy Scriptures the numeral a thousand is used to be taken as signifying a generalization. Thus, the Psalmist saith The word which He commanded to a thousand generations, whereas it is notorious that the Evangelist doth not reckon more then seventy-and-seven generations between the very beginning of the world and the coming of our Redeemer. What therefore is to be understood here by a thousand. The general ripeness of the old generation to bring forth a new offspring. Hence also it is said by John And shall reign with Him a thousand years, because the reign of the Holy Church will be over all mankind made perfect.

R. Hide not thy face from me, O Lord Withdraw not thine hand far from me
* And let not thy dread make me afraid.
V. O Lord, correct me but in mercy not in thine anger, lest Thou bring me to nothing.
R. And let not thy dread make me afraid.

Reading 8: When times one is ten, and ten times ten is an hundred, and ten times an hundred is a thousand. Observing therefore this connection between one and a thousand, what are we to understand by the one (in the text, connected as it is with the thousand whereby we understand perfection)? Is it not the beginning of a good life, even as the thousand representeth perfection? The contending with God (which is spoken of in the text) is the nonacknowledgment of that which is owed to Him, and the vain-glorying instead in our own strength. But an holy man should see, that even if one had received the gifts of perfection, and were to make them the grounds of self-glorifying, such an one would thereby lose all that he had received.

R. O that my sins, whereby I have deserved wrath* And the calamity whereunder I suffer, were laid in the balances together.
V. For now it would appear heavier than the sand of the sea, therefore also my words are full of sorrow.
R. And the calamity, whereunder I suffer, were laid in the balances together.
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. And the calamity, whereunder I suffer, were laid in the balances together.

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