Wednesday, 28 September 2016

Dedication of St Michael the Archangel

Nocturn I: Daniel 7:9-11; 10:4-14

Reading 1
Lesson from the book of Daniel
Dan 7:9-11
9 I beheld till thrones were placed, and the Ancient of days sat: his garment was white as snow, and the hair of his head like clean wool: his throne like flames of fire: the wheels of it like a burning fire.
10 A swift stream of fire issued forth from before him: thousands of thousands ministered to him, and ten thousand times a hundred thousand stood before him: the judgment sat, and the books were opened.
11 I beheld because of the voice of the great words which that horn spoke: and I saw that the beast was slain, and the body thereof was destroyed, and given to the fire to be burnt:
V. But thou, O Lord, have mercy upon us.
R. Thanks be to God.

R. There was silence in heaven while the dragon fought against Michael the Archangel.* I heard the voice of thousands of thousands, saying: Salvation, and honour, and power unto God the Almighty.
V. Thousands of thousands ministered unto Him, and ten thousand times hundreds of thousands stood before Him.
R. I heard the voice of thousands of thousands, saying: Salvation, and honour, and power unto God, the Almighty.

Reading 2:  And in the four and twentieth day of the first month I was by the great river which is the Tigris. And I lifted up my eyes, and I saw: and behold a man clothed in linen, and his loins were girded with the finest gold:  And his body was like the chrysolite, and his face as the appearance of lightning, and his eyes as a burning lamp: and his arms, and all downward even to the feet, like in appearance to glittering brass: and the voice of his word like the voice of a multitude.

R. An Angel stood at the Altar of the temple, having a golden censer in his hand and there was given unto him much incense;
* And the smoke of the incense ascended up before the Lord, out of the Angel's hand.
V. Before the Angels will I sing praise unto thee; I will worship toward thy holy temple, and praise thy Name, O Lord.
R. And the smoke of the incense ascended up before the Lord, out of the Angel's hand.

Reading 3: And I Daniel alone saw the vision: for the men that were with me saw it not: but an exceeding great terror fell upon them, and they fled away, and hid themselves. And I being left alone saw this great vision: and there remained no strength in me, and the appearance of my countenance was changed in me, and I fainted away, and retained no strength. And I heard the voice of his words: and when I heard, I lay in a consternation, upon my face, and my face was close to the ground.

R. Before the Angels will I sing praise unto thee, and will worship toward thy holy temple * And I will praise thy Name, O Lord.
V. For thy loving kindness, and for thy truth; for Thou hast glorified thine holy Name on us.
R. And I will praise thy Name, O Lord.

Reading 4: And behold a hand touched me, and lifted me up upon my knees, and upon the joints of my hands. And he said to me: Daniel, thou man of desires, understand the words that I speak to thee, and stand upright: for I am sent now to thee. And when he had said this word to me, I stood trembling. And he said to me: Fear not, Daniel: for from the first day that thou didst set thy heart to understand, to afflict thyself in the sight of thy God, thy words have been heard: and I am come for thy words. But the prince of the kingdom of the Persians resisted me one and twenty days: and behold Michael, one of the chief princes, came to help me, and I remained there by the king of the Persians. But I am come to teach thee what things shall befall thy people in the latter days, for as yet the vision is for days.

Nocturn II: Sermon 34 on the Gospels of St Gregory the Great

Reading 5: We say that there are nine Orders of Angels, for, by the witness of the holy Word, we know that there be Angels, Archangels, Mights, Powers, Principalities, Dominions, Thrones, Cherubim, and Seraphim. Nearly every page of the holy Word witnesseth that there be Angels and Archangels. The books of the Prophets, as is well known, do oftentimes make mention of Cherubim and Seraphim. Paul, writing to the Ephesians, counteth up the names of four Orders, where he saith: "The Father of glory raised (Christ) from the dead, and set Him at His own right hand in the heavenly places, far above all Principality, and Power, and Might, and Dominion, (and every name that is named, not only in this world, but also in that which is to come.)" And the same, again, writing to the Colossians, saith: "By (the Son) were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be Thrones, or Dominions, or Principalities, or Powers; (all things were created by Him and for Him.)" If, then, we add the Thrones to the four Orders of which he spake unto the Ephesians, we have five Orders; and when we add unto them the Angels and the Archangels, the Cherubim and the Seraphim, we find that the Orders of Angels are beyond all doubt nine.

R. This is Michael, who to battle leads the armies of the skies* Whosoever on him calleth blessed within his wardship lies. His a prayer whose voice availing aids from earth toward heaven to rise.
V. The Archangel Michael is the Vice-Roy of Paradise, and the Angels that are the dwellers therein, do hold him in worship.
R. Whosoever on him calleth blessed within his wardship lies. His a prayer whose voice availing aids from earth toward heaven to rise.

Reading 6: But we must know that the word Angel is the designation, not of a nature, but of an office. Those holy spirits in the.heavenly fatherland are always spirits, but they may no wise be always called Angels, (which is, being interpreted, messengers,) for they are Angels only when they are sent as Messengers. Hence also it is said by the Psalmist: Who makest spirits thine Angels! as if it were, Of them who are always with Him as spirits, He doth somewhiles make use as Messengers.

R. Where Angels lead the spirits of the blessed dead the glad procession moves with Michael at its head
* To lead them into the garden of Eden.
V. Lord, send thy Holy Spirit from heaven the Spirit of wisdom and understanding.
R. To lead them into the garden of Eden.

Reading 7: They who go on the lesser messages are called Angels they who go on the greater Archangels. Hence it is that unto the Virgin Mary was sent no common Angel, but the Archangel Gabriel. For the delivery of this, the highest message, it was meet that there should be sent the highest Angel. Their individual names also are so given as to signify the kind of ministry wherein each is powerful. Michael signifieth: Who-is-like-unto-God? Gabriel, the Strength-of-God, and Raphael, the Medicine-of-God.

R. At that time shall Michael stand up, which standeth for your children.
* And there shall be a time, such as never was since there was a nation even to that same time.
V. At that time thy people shall be delivered, every one that shall be found written in the Book of Life.
R. And there shall be a time, such as never was since there was a nation even to that same time.

Reading 8: As often as anything very mighty is to be done, we see that Michael is sent, that by that very thing, and by his name, we may remember that none is able to do as God doeth. Hence that old enemy whose pride hath puffed him up to be fain to be like unto God, even he who said, I will ascend unto heaven, I will exalt my throne above the stars of God. I will be like the Most High, this old enemy, when at the end of the world he is about to perish in the last death, having no strength but his own, is shown unto us a-fighting with Michael the Archangel, even as saith John: There was war in heaven Michael and his Angels fought against the dragon; and the dragon fought and his angels. Unto Mary is sent Gabriel, whose name is interpreted the Strength of God, for he came to herald the appearing of Him Who was content to appear lowly that He might fight down the powers of the air. Raphael, also, as we have said, signifieth the Medicine-of-God, and it is the name of him who touched as a physician the eyes of Tobias, and cleared away his blindness.

Nocturn III: Homily of St Jerome on Matthew 3

Reading 9: From the Holy Gospel according to Matthew: At that time came the disciples unto Jesus, saying: Who is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven? And so on.

After the finding of the piece of money in the fish's mouth, after the payment of the tribute, what meaneth this sudden question of the Apostles? Who is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven? They had seen that the same tribute-money was paid for Peter as for the Lord, and from this equality of reckoning they gathered that Peter was Prince of all the Apostles, seeing that he had been appraised at the same price as his Master. Therefore they ask, Who is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven? And Jesus, seeing their thoughts, and understanding wherefore they erred, is fain to take away the desire of glory by the love of lowliness.

R. Be not ye afraid before the Gentiles, but in your hearts, worship ye the Lord, and fear Him
* For His Angel is with you.
V. An Angel stood at the Altar of the Temple, having a golden censer in his hand.
R. For His Angel is with you.

Reading 10: Therefore, if thy hand or thy foot offend thee, cut them off, and cast them from thee for it must needs be that offences come, but woe to that man by whom the offence cometh! because by his sin he maketh, and maketh to be his own work, that which must needs be in the world. Away, then, with every affection and every kinship, lest thy love should throw a stumbling-block before a single believer.

R. The Archangel Michael came to help God's people.* He arose to succour the spirits of the righteous.
V. An Angel stood at the Altar of the Temple, having a golden censer in his hand.
R. He arose to succour the spirits of the righteous.

Reading 11: Be there any, saith He, who is as near to thee as thine hand, thy foot, or thine eye, useful, careful, far-seeing, but who layeth a stumbling-block before thee, and whose diverse way of life may draw thee to hell it is better for thee to lose such an one and thy worldly happiness with him, than to live surrounded by them that are near and needful to thee, and to pile up unto thyself damnation.

Reading 12: I say unto you that in heaven their angels do always behold the face of My Father. Above, He had said that every tie of kinship or of convenience which might become a stumbling-block, albeit close and needful as hand, or foot, or eye, was to be cut off, but here He softeneth the hardness of that precept: Take heed that ye despise not one of these little ones. Hardness, saith He, I command not save as teaching tenderness withal; in heaven their Angels do always behold the face of My Father. Oh, how great is the dignity of souls, whereof every one hath from its birth an Angel appointed to guard it! Hence, we read in the Revelation of John unto the Angel of the Church of Ephesus, (and so of the others,) write, And the Apostle (Paul) also saith: The woman (that is, in the Church) ought to have a covering on her head, because of the Angels.

Gospel: Matthew 18:1-10

The disciples came to Jesus at this time and said, Tell us, who is greatest in the kingdom of heaven?  Whereupon Jesus called to his side a little child, to whom he gave a place in the midst of them, and said, Believe me, unless you become like little children again, you shall not enter the kingdom of heaven. He is greatest in the kingdom of heaven who will abase himself like this little child. He who gives welcome to such a child as this in my name, gives welcome to me. And if anyone hurts the conscience of one of these little ones, that believe in me, he had better have been drowned in the depths of the sea, with a mill-stone hung about his neck. Woe to the world, for the hurt done to consciences! It must needs be that such hurt should come, but woe to the man through whom it comes!  If thy hand or thy foot is an occasion of falling to thee, cut it off and cast it away from thee; better for thee to enter into life crippled or lame, than to have two hands or two feet when thou art cast into eternal fire. And if thy eye is an occasion of falling to thee, pluck it out and cast it away from thee; better for thee to enter into life with one eye, than to have two eyes when thou art cast into the fires of hell. See to it that you do not treat one of these little ones with contempt; I tell you, they have angels of their own in heaven, that behold the face of my heavenly Father continually. 

Saturday, 24 September 2016

Matins readings for the Fourth Sunday of September (Nocturns I&II)



Nocturn I: Judith 1:1-12;2:1-3


Reading 1: Now Arphaxad king of the Medes had brought many nations under his dominions, and he built a very strong city, which he called Ecbatana, Of stones squared and hewed: he made the walls thereof seventy cubits broad, and thirty cubits high, and the towers thereof he made a hundred cubits high. But on the square of them, each side was extended the space of twenty feet.  And he made the gates thereof according to the height of the towers: And he gloried as a mighty one in the force of his army and in the glory of his chariots.

R. O Adonai, O Lord God, Thou art great and glorious. Who hast given salvation into the hand of a woman:* Graciously hear the prayers of thy servants.
V. Blessed art Thou, O Lord, Who failest none that put their trust in thee, and humblest such as boast themselves in their own strength.
R. Graciously hear the prayers of thy servants.

Reading 2: Now in the twelfth year of his reign, Nabuchodonosor king of the Assyrians, who reigned in Ninive the great city, fought against Arphaxad and overcame him, In the great plain which is called Ragua, about the Euphrates, and the Tigris, and the Jadason, in the plain of Erioch the king of the Elicians. Then was the kingdom of Nabuchodonosor exalted, and his heart was elevated: and he sent to all that dwelt in Cilicia and Damascus, and Libanus, And to the nations that are in Carmelus, and Cedar, and to the inhabitants of Galilee in the great plain of Asdrelon, And to all that were in Samaria, and beyond the river Jordan even to Jerusalem, and all the land of Jesse till you come to the borders of Ethiopia.

R. We have heard of the tribulation of those cities, which they have suffered, and we have fainted. Fear and confusion of mind are fallen upon us. Even the mountains will not give us a refuge.* Lord, have mercy.
V. We have sinned like our forefathers, we have done unjustly, and wrought iniquity.
R. Lord, have mercy.

Reading 3: To all these Nabuchodonosor king of the Assyrians, sent messengers:  But they all with one mind refused, and sent them back empty, and rejected them without honour. Then king Nabuchodonosor being angry against all that land, swore by his throne and kingdom that he would revenge himself of all those countries.

R. The Lord bless thee by His power, Who hath brought our enemies to nought through thee.
* And may the praise of thee never fail from the mouth of men.
V. Blessed be the Lord, Who hath created the heaven and the earth, because that He hath so glorified thy name this day.
R. And may the praise of thee never fail from the mouth of men.

Reading 4:  In the thirteenth year of the reign of Nabuchodonosor, the two and twentieth day of the first month, the word was given out in the house of Nabuchodonosor king of the Assyrians, that he would revenge himself.  And he called all the ancients, and all the governors, and his officers of war, and communicated to them the secret of his counsel:  And he said that his thoughts were to bring all the earth under his empire.

Nocturn II: St Ambrose on Elijah and fasting

Reading 5: It is not for kings to drink wine, nor for princes strong drink, lest they drink and forget the law. The rulers drank wine even unto drunkenness, who planned to deliver themselves into the hand of Holofernes, captain of the host of the King of the Assyrians but the woman Judith drank not, who fasted all the days of her widowhood, saving the solemn Feast-days. She went forth in the harness of this abstinence, and over - reached the whole army of the Assyrians. By the clear thought of her soberness she took away the head of Holofernes, kept her chastity, and carried off the victory.

R. We know no strange God before the Lord. In Him we trust.
* He despiseth us not, neither putteth He away His salvation from our nation.
V. His mercy let us seek with tears, and humble our souls before Him.
R. He despiseth us not, neither putteth He away His salvation from our nation.

Reading 6: Armed with fasting, she entered the camp of the strangers he lay soaked in wine, so that he could not feel the blow that slew him. And thus the fast of one woman overthrew the countless armies of the Assyrians. Esther also became fairer by fasting for the Lord gave favour unto her for her soberness. She delivered all her nation, that is, the whole people of the Jews, from the fierceness of persecution, so that she brought down the King himself under her will.

R. O Lord, Ruler of the heavens and of the earth, Maker of the waters, King of every creature,
* Graciously hear the prayer of thy servants.
V. Thou, O Lord, unto Whom the supplications of the humble and meek are alway well-pleasing
R. Graciously hear the prayer of thy servants.

Reading 7: Thus also (Esther) who fasted three days, and washed her body with water, found greater favour, and obtained vengeance, whereas Haman, who boasted himself at the King's table, paid the penalty of his drunkenness, even while yet he was in his cups. Fasting, therefore, is a sacrifice of reconciliation, a means of strength, whereby in the might of grace, women wax manful.

R. O Lord God, That breakest the battles from of old, lift up thine arm against the Gentiles, that devise evil against thy servants.* And let thy right hand be glorified in us.
V. Throw down their strength in thy power, and bring down their force in thy wrath.
R. And let thy right hand be glorified in us.

Reading 8: Fasting knoweth not usury, nor the gain of the usurer the faster's table smelleth not of usury, but the fast itself giveth favour to them that sit at meat. A banquet is all the pleasanter after hunger, whereas by constant use it becometh unattractive, and when it is long carried on cometh to be lightly esteemed. Fasting is a good sauce for meat. The keener the appetite, the more toothsome the food.

V I have never put my hope in any other but in You, O God of Israel*who can show both anger and graciousness, and who absolves all the sins of suffering man
R: Lord God, Creator of Heaven and Earth be mindful of our lowliness
V: who can show both anger and graciousness, and who absolves all the sins of suffering man
R: Glory be to the Father, and to the Son and the Holy Ghost
V: who can show both anger and graciousness, and who absolves all the sins of suffering man

Matins readings for the Nineteenth Sunday after Pentecost



Nocturn III (Homily 38 on the Gospels by Pope St Gregory the Great)

Reading 9: I remember that I have often said that, in the Holy Gospel, the Church as she now is, is called the kingdom of heaven, for the kingdom of heaven is indeed the assembly of the righteous. The Lord hath said by the mouth of His Prophet The heaven is My throne.  Solomon saith The throne of wisdom is the soul of the righteous. And Paul saith that Christ is the power of God and the wisdom of God. From these passages we may clearly gather that if wisdom be God, and wisdom's throne be the soul of the righteous, and God's throne be the heaven, then the soul of the righteous is heaven. Hence also the Psalmist saith, speaking of holy preachers The heavens declare the glory of God.

R. Strengthen me, O King, Who reignest over the holy ones.* Put Thou in my mouth clear and well-sounding words.
V. O Lord, King of all forces, turn back their device upon themselves.
R. Put Thou in my mouth clear and well-sounding words.

Reading 10: The kingdom of heaven, therefore, is the Church of the righteous, even of them whose hearts seek not for anything upon earth, but who sigh so continually after the things which are above, that God doth already reign in them as He doth in heaven. Let it then be said, The kingdom of heaven is like unto a certain king, which made a marriage for his son. Ye already understand, my loving friends, who is that Royal Father of a Royal Son. It is indeed no other than He to Whom the Psalmist saith : Give the King thy judgments, O God, and thy righteousness unto the King's son.

Reading 11: Which made a marriage for his son. God the Father made a marriage for God the Son, when He wedded Him to the manhood in the womb of the Virgin, when He willed that He Who is God before all ages, should in the end of the ages become Man. The marriage union is the union of two persons, but God forbid that we should imagine that the One Person of our Redeemer Jesus Christ, Who is both God and Man, is formed by a union of an human person with a Divine Person.

Reading 12: We profess concerning Him that He is of, and in two natures, but we shrink from the blasphemy of saying that He is compounded of two persons. It will therefore be clearer and safer to say that the marriage which the Father made for His Royal Son was the wedding Him, through the mystery of the Incarnation, to His mystic Bride the Holy Church. The womb of the Maiden Mother was the marriage chamber in which this union took place. Hence it is that the Psalmist saith: In the sun hath He set His tabernacle, Who is as a bridegroom coming out of his chamber.

R. One Seraph cried unto another:
* Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts; the whole earth is full of His glory.
V. There are Three That bear record in heaven: the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost, and these Three are One.
R. Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts.
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. The whole earth is full of His glory.

Gospel: Matthew 22:1-14

And Jesus answering, spoke again in parables to them, saying: The kingdom of heaven is likened to a king, who made a marriage for his son. And he sent his servants, to call them that were invited to the marriage; and they would not come.  Again he sent other servants, saying: Tell them that were invited, Behold, I have prepared my dinner; my calves and fatlings are killed, and all things are ready: come ye to the marriage.  But they neglected, and went their own ways, one to his farm, and another to his merchandise. And the rest laid hands on his servants, and having treated them contumeliously, put them to death. But when the king had heard of it, he was angry, and sending his armies, he destroyed those murderers, and burnt their city.  Then he saith to his servants: The marriage indeed is ready; but they that were invited were not worthy.  Go ye therefore into the highways; and as many as you shall find, call to the marriage.  And his servants going forth into the ways, gathered together all that they found, both bad and good: and the marriage was filled with guests. And the king went in to see the guests: and he saw there a man who had not on a wedding garment.  And he saith to him: Friend, how camest thou in hither not having a wedding garment? But he was silent.  Then the king said to the waiters: Bind his hands and feet, and cast him into the exterior darkness: there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.  For many are called, but few are chosen.

Friday, 23 September 2016

Ember Saturday of September

The readings for Ember Saturday are from St Gregory's Homily 31 on the Gospels.

Reading 1: Continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Luke: At that time, Jesus spake unto the multitudes this parable: A certain man had a fig-tree planted in his vineyard, and he came and sought fruit thereon, and found none. And so on.

Our Lord and Redeemer speaketh unto us sometimes by words, and sometimes by deeds, sometimes one thing by words, and another by deeds, and sometimes the same thing both by word and deed. In the portion of the Gospel which hath this day been read, ye have heard, my brethren, two things, the parable of the fig-tree and the history of the woman which was bowed together. In both is a manifestation of the Lord's mercy, but in the one by a parable, in the other by an example. But the barren fig-tree signifieth the same thing as doth the woman bowed together, and the patience shown to the fig-tree the same thing as doth the healing of the woman bowed together.

R. We have heard of the tribulation of those cities, which they have suffered, and we have fainted. Fear and confusion of mind are fallen upon us. Even the mountains will not give us a refuge.* Lord, have mercy.
V. We have sinned like our forefathers, we have done unjustly, and wrought iniquity.
R. Lord, have mercy.

Reading 2: What is the fig-tree a type, but of mankind? Of what is the woman bowed together by a spirit of infirmity a type, but of the same mankind? Man was originally placed in a garden like the fig-tree, and created upright like the woman, but man fell away by his own willful fault like the fig-tree he brought forth no fruit like the woman he ceased to stand straight. When he willfully went into sin, because he would not bring forth the fruit of obedience, he lost his uprightness. The nature which had been created in the image of God, continued not in honour, but cast aside the state wherein it had been placed and made. The lord of the vineyard came thrice to the fig-tree, for God hath come in hope, and in warning, seeking fruit from mankind under three successive dispensations, that is to say, before the law, under the law, and under grace.

Reading 3: It came before the law, in that by natural understanding, He let all know by example of Himself, what and how they should do toward their neighbor. In the law He came teaching. After the law He came by grace, opening, manifesting His merciful Presence. But after all these three years He yet hath to complain that He findeth no fruit upon the fig-tree, for there are still some degraded minds which the inborn voice of the natural law doth not control, which the commandments do not teach, and which the wonders of the Incarnation itself do not convert. Of what is the dresser of the vineyard a type, but of the Episcopacy? For these are they who have the government in the Church, and are therefore truly called the dressers of the Lord's vineyard.
V. But thou, O Lord, have mercy upon us.
R. Thanks be to God.


Thursday, 22 September 2016

Ember Friday of September

The readings for the Ember Friday are the same as in the Roman Office, viz, taken from St Gregory's Homily 33 on the Gospels:

Reading 1: Continuation of the Holy Gospel according to Luke: At that time, one of the Pharisees desired that Jesus would eat with him. And He went into the Pharisee's house, and sat down to meat. And so on.

Of what is the Pharisee that was exalted by self-righteousness a type, but of the Jewish people? And of what the woman which was a sinner and came and wept at the Lord's feet, but of the conversion of the Gentiles? She brought an alabaster box of ointment, and stood at His feet behind Him weeping, and began to wash His Feet with tears, and did wipe them with the hairs of her head, and kissed His Feet, and anointed them with the ointment. Of us, therefore, even of us, was that woman a type, if after our sins we turn unto the Lord with all our heart, and imitate the example of her repentant grief. And of what is the ointment a type, but of the sweet savour of a good reputation? Whence also Paul saith: In every place we are unto God a sweet savour of Christ.

R. Our poverty was enough for us, that it might have been accounted riches. O that the money had never been, for which thou hast sent away our son,* The staff of our old age.
V. Alas my son, wherefore have we sent thee wandering, even thee, the light of our eyes
R. The staff of our old age.

Reading 2: If therefore we do good works, whereby we gain for the Church the savour of good reputation, what do we but pour ointment upon the body of the Lord? But the woman stood at the Feet of Jesus, behind Him we stood opposite to the Feet of the Lord, what time we were in sin, and went contrary unto His ways. But when we turn again, and truly repent us of our sins, we stand behind His Feet, for we follow His footsteps against Whom we once contended. The woman washed His Feet with her tears and we do in very deed the same when we show the tenderness of sympathy to any of His humbler members, when we feel with His Saints in their tribulations, when we make their woes our own.

R. Bless the God of heaven, and confess Him before all living:* For He hath had mercy upon you.
V. Bless Him, and sing praises unto Him, and tell of all His marvellous works.
R. For He hath had mercy upon you.

Reading 3: She wipes the Lord's Feet with our hair when we give charity, even out of such things as we have ourselves no need of, to His holy ones, with whom we feel in their trials, in as far as our heart so sympathizeth, that the bounty of our hand showeth the truth of our compassion. He washeth the Feet of the Redeemer, but wipeth them not with his hair, who feeleth for the sufferings of his neighbours, but nevertheless, relieveth them not, even out of such things as he himself hath no need for. He weepeth, but wipeth not, who offereth words of tenderness, but sootheth not sorrow by giving such things as be lacking. The woman kissed the Feet and we do fully the same, if we warmly love those whom out of bounty we support, so that the neediness of our neighbour is not grievous unto us, nor the penury which we relieve a weariness to us, nor, when the hand is giving what is needful, the heart is untouched by compassion.

R. It is time for me to return unto Him That sent me;* But bless ye God, and tell of all His marvelous works.
V. Confess Him before all living, for He hath had mercy upon you.
R. But bless ye God, and tell of all His marvelous works.
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. But bless ye God, and tell of all His marvelous works.

Tuesday, 20 September 2016

Feast of St Matthew

Nocturn I: Ezekiel 1:1-12 (Common of Evangelists)

Reading 1:  Now it came to pass in the thirtieth year, in the fourth month, on the fifth day of the month, when I was in the midst of the captives by the river Chobar, the heavens were opened, and I saw the visions of God. On the fifth day of the month, the same was the fifth year of the captivity of king Joachin, The word of the Lord came to Ezechiel the priest the son of Buzi in the land of the Chaldeans, by the river Chobar: and the hand of the Lord was there upon him.

R. Behold I send you as sheep in the midst of wolves, said the Lord:
* Be ye therefore wise as serpents and simple as doves.
V. Whilst you have the light, believe in the light, that you may be the children of light
R. Be ye therefore wise as serpents and simple as doves.

Reading 2: And I saw, and behold a whirlwind came out of the north: and a great cloud, and a fire infolding it, and brightness was about it: and out of the midst thereof, that is, out of the midst of the fire, as it were the resemblance of amber. And in the midst thereof the likeness of four living creatures: and this was their appearance: there was the likeness of a man in them. Every one had four faces, and every one four wings. Their feet were straight feet, and the sole of their foot was like the sole of a calf's foot, and they sparkled like the appearance of glowing brass.

R. Take up my yoke upon you, said the Lord, and learn of me, because I am meek, and humble of heart
* For my yoke is sweet and my burden light.
V. And you shall find rest to your souls.
R. For my yoke is sweet and my burden light.

Reading 3: And they had the hands of a man under their wings on their four sides: and they had faces, and wings on the four sides, And the wings of one were joined to the wings of another. They turned not when they went: but every one went straight forward. And as for the likeness of their faces: there was the face of a man, and the face of a lion on the right side of all the four: and the face of an ox, on the left side of all the four: and the face of an eagle over all the four.

R. But when they shall deliver you up to the judges, take no thought how or what to speak:
* for it shall be given you in that hour what to speak:
V. For it is not you that speak, but the spirit of your Father that speaketh in you.
R. For it shall be given you in that hour what to speak.

Reading 4: And their faces, and their wings were stretched upward: two wings of every one were joined, and two covered their bodies: And every one of them went straight forward: whither the impulse of the spirit was to go, thither they went: and they turned not when they went.

Nocturn II

Reading 5: It came to pass one day at Capernaum, that Christ went forth, and saw a publican, named Levi, sitting at the receipt of custom; and He said unto him: Follow Me. And he left all, rose up, and followed Him. And Levi made Him a great feast in his own house. This Levi is the Apostle and Evangelist Matthew. After that Christ was risen again from the dead, and while he was yet in Judea, before he set forth for that land which had fallen to the lot of his preaching, he wrote the Gospel of Jesus Christ in the Hebrew tongue, for the sake of them of the circumcision who had believed. His was the first written of the four Gospels. Thereafter he went to Ethiopia, and there preached the Gospel, confirming his preaching with many miracles.

R. I saw men standing together, clad in shining raiment, and the Angel of the Lord spake unto me, saying
* These men are holy, for they are the friends of God.
V. I saw a strong Angel of God fly into the midst of heaven, saying with a loud voice
R. These men are holy, for they are the friends of God.

Reading 6: Of his miracles, the most notable was that he raised the King's daughter from the dead, and thereby brought to believe in Christ the King her father, his wife, and all that region. After that the King was dead, Hirtacus, who came after him, was fain to take his daughter Iphigenia to wife, but by the exhortation of Matthew she had made vow of her maidenhood to God, and stood firm to that holy resolution, for which cause Hirtacus commanded to slay the Apostle at the Altar while he was performing the mystery. He crowned the dignity of the Apostleship with the glory of martyrdom upon the 21 st day of September. His body had been brought to Salerno, where it was afterwards buried in a Church dedicated in his name during the papacy of Gregory VII, and there it is held in great worship and sought to by great gatherings of people.

R. Blessed are ye when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for My sake;
* Rejoice, and be exceeding glad, for great is your reward in heaven.
V. When men shall hate you, and when they shall separate you from their company, and shall reproach you, and cast out your name as evil, for the Son of Man's sake.
R. Rejoice, and be exceeding glad, for great is your reward in heaven.

Reading 7 (St Gregory on Ezekiel): The Prophet writeth very minutely touching the four holy living creatures, whom he saw in the spirit as being to come. He saith Every one had four faces, and every one had four wings. What signifieth the face save likeness whereby we are known? or wings, save the power to fly? since it is by the face that man is known from man, and by their wings that the birds' bodies are carried up into the air. So the face pertaineth to certitude, and the wings to contemplation. With certitude we are known of God Almighty, Who saith: I am the Good Shepherd, and know My sheep, and am known of Mine.  And again: I know whom I have chosen.

R. These are they which have conquered, and are become the friends of God, who recked not of the commandments of princes, and earned the everlasting reward.
* And now have they crowns on their heads, and palms in their hands.
V. These are they which came out of great tribulation, and have washed their robes in the blood of the Lamb.
R. And now have they crowns on their heads, and palms in their hands.

Reading 8: And by contemplation, whereby we rise above ourselves, we as it were fly heavenwards.[rest not available online]

Nocturn III - St Jerome

Reading 9: From the Holy Gospel according to Matthew: At that time, Jesus saw a man, named Matthew, sitting at the receipt of custom; and He saith unto him Follow Me. And so on.

The other Evangelists, out of tenderness towards the reputation and honour of Matthew, have abstained from speaking of him as a publican by his ordinary name, and have called him Levi. Both names were his. But Matthew himself, according to what Solomon saith: The just man is the first to accuse himself, and again, in another place: Declare thou thy sins that thou mayest be justified, doth plainly call himself Matthew the publican, to show unto his readers that none need be hopeless of salvation if he will but strive to do better, since he himself had been all of a sudden changed from a publican into an Apostle.

R. These are they who while yet they lived in the flesh, planted the Church in their own blood* They drank of the Lord's cup, and became the friends of God.
V. Their sound is gone out through all the earth, and their words to the ends of the world.
R. They drank of the Lord's cup, and became the friends of God.

Reading 10: Porphyry and the Emperor Julian (the Apostate) will have it that the account of this call of Matthew is either a stupid blunder on the part of a lying writer, or else that it showeth what fools they were who followed the Saviour, to go senselessly after any one who called them. But there can be no doubt that before the Apostles believed they had considered the great signs and works of power which had gone before.

R. These men are saints, whom the Lord hath chosen in love unfeigned, and hath given them glory everlasting. These are they
* By the light of whose teaching the Church is glorified, even as the moon is glorified by the light of the sun.
V. The saints through faith subdued kingdoms, wrought righteousness.
R. By the light of whose teaching the Church is glorified, even as the moon is glorified by the light of the sun.

Reading 11: Moreover, the glory and majesty of the hidden God, which shone somewhat through the Face of the Man Christ Jesus, were enough to draw them which gazed thereon, even at first sight. For if there be in a stone a magnetic power which can make rings and straws and rods come and cleave thereunto, how much more must not the Lord of all creatures have been able to draw unto Himself them whom He called?

Reading 12: And it came to pass, as Jesus sat at meat in the house, behold, many publicans and sinners came and sat down with Him. They saw how that a publican who had turned to better things had found a place of repentance, and therefore they also hoped for salvation. It was not, as the Scribes and Pharisees complained, sinners clinging to their sinfulness who came to Jesus, but sinners repenting, as indeed appeareth from the next words of the Lord, where He saith: I will have mercy and not sacrifice; for I am not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance. The Lord went to eat with sinners to the end that He might have occasion to teach, and to break spiritual bread unto them which bade Him.

Gospel: Matthew 9

As he passed further on his way, Jesus saw a man called Matthew sitting at work in the customs-house, and said to him, Follow me; and Matthew rose from his place and followed him.  And afterwards, when he was taking a meal in the house, many publicans and sinners were to be found at table with him and his disciples.  The Pharisees saw this, and asked his disciples, How comes it that your master eats with publicans and sinners?  Jesus heard it, and said, It is not those who are in health that have need of the physician, it is those who are sick.  Go home and find out what the words mean, It is mercy that wins favour with me, not sacrifice. I have come to call sinners, not the just.

Saturday, 17 September 2016

Matins readings for the Third Sunday in September

Nocturn I: Tobit 1:1-15

Reading 1: Tobias of the tribe and city of Nephtali, (which is in the upper parts of Galilee above Naasson, beyond the way that leadeth to the west, having on the right hand the city of Sephet,)
When he was made captive in the days of Salmanasar king of the Assyrians, even in his captivity, forsook not the way of truth, But every day gave all he could get to his brethren his fellow captives, that were of his kindred. And when he was younger than any of the tribe of Nephtali, yet did he no childish thing in his work.

R. We have heard of the tribulation of those cities, which they have suffered, and we have fainted. Fear and confusion of mind are fallen upon us. Even the mountains will not give us a refuge.
* Lord, have mercy.
V. We have sinned like our forefathers, we have done unjustly, and wrought iniquity.
R. Lord, have mercy.

Reading 2: Moreover when all went to the golden calves which Jeroboam king of Israel had made, he alone fled the company of all, And went to Jerusalem to the temple of the Lord, and there adored the Lord God of Israel, offering faithfully all his firstfruits, and his tithes, So that in the third year he gave all his tithes to the proselytes, and strangers. These and such like things did he observe when but a boy according to the law of God.

R. In all seasons bless God, and ask of Him to order thy goings* And in all seasons let thy counsels be steadfastly in Him.
V. Seek faithfully and with all thy strength to do such things as please Him.
R. And in all seasons let thy counsels be steadfastly in Him.

Reading 3: But when he was a man, he took to wife Anna of his own tribe, and had a son by her, whom he called after his own name, And from his infancy he taught him to fear God, and to abstain from all sin. And when by the captivity he with his wife and his son and all his tribe was come to the city of Ninive, (When all ate of the meats of the Gentiles) he kept his soul and never was defiled with their meats.

R. My son, remember that we have but a frail life.* If thou fear God thou shalt have great goods.
V. Be mindful of Him, and beware lest ever thou transgress His commandments.
R. If thou fear God thou shalt have great goods.

Reading 4: And because he was mindful of the Lord with all his heart, God gave him favour in the sight of Salmanasar the king. And he gave him leave to go whithersoever he would, with liberty to do whatever he had a mind.  He therefore went to all that were in captivity, and gave them wholesome admonitions.

Nocturn II: Sermon 94 of St Leo

Reading 5: Well do I know, dearly beloved, that many of you are fervent in your observance of all those practices which belong to the Christian Faith, so that ye have no need to be admonished by our exhortations. For what tradition hath laid down, and custom well established, is neither unknown to the learned nor neglected by the devout. But because it appertaineth to the priestly office to exercise the same general care over all the Church's children in all such matters as be profitable alike to the learned and to the simple (both of whom are equally dear to us), we do now exhort the both of you to celebrate, with lively faith, and all due discipline of soul and body, the Quarterly Fast, which the seventh month [that is, September] doth once again bring to us in its yearly round.

R. Our poverty was enough for us, that it might have been accounted riches. O that the money had never been, for which thou hast sent away our son,
* The staff of our old age.
V. Alas my son, wherefore have we sent thee wandering, even thee, the light of our eyes
R. The staff of our old age.

Reading 6: The Ember Days of fasting are appointed to the four seasons, in order that their quarterly recurrence in the course of the year may teach us how unceasingly we need to be purified, and how, as long as we are tossed about by the changes and chances of this life, we need through fasting and alms-deeds to be cleansed from the stain of that sin which we have contracted by the frailty of our flesh and our concupiscence.

R. Bless the God of heaven, and confess Him before all living:* For He hath had mercy upon you.
V. Bless Him, and sing praises unto Him, and tell of all His marvellous works.
R. For He hath had mercy upon you.

Reading 7: Let us diminish a little, beloved, what we are accustomed to use for ourselves, in order that we have somewhat more to use for the relief of the poor and needy.The conscience of the generous can thus be made glad by the fruits of their own liberality. Whilst thou art giving happiness thou shalt receive joy. Thy love for thy neighbour is a unity with thy love for God; and he hath taught us that in the unity of this twofold charity is to be found the fulfillment of all the Law and the Prophets. Further, if anyone doubt that what is given to man is offered to God, we have the saying of our Lord and Saviour, when he spake of feeding and helping the poor: Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these, my brethren, ye have done it unto me.

R. It is time for me to return unto Him That sent me* But bless ye God, and tell of all His marvellous works.
V. Confess Him before all living, for He hath had mercy upon you.
R. But bless ye God, and tell of all His marvellous works.

Reading 8: Wherefore, let us fast on Ember Wednesday and Friday; and on Ember Saturday let us also keep vigil at the shrine of blessed Peter the Apostle; by whose merits and prayers we believe that we shall be aided, so that we may please our merciful God in our fasting and prayer.

Matins readings for the Eighteenth Sunday after Pentecost (Nocturn III and Gospel)


Nocturn III: Homily of St Maximus, Sermon 108

Reading 9: From the Holy Gospel according to Matthew: At that time Jesus entered into a ship, and passed over, and came into His own city. And so on.

This day's reading hath shown us an instance of how Christ, in those things which He did as Man, worked deep works of God, and by things which were seen wrought things which were not seen. The Evangelist saith Jesus " entered into a ship, and passed over, and came into His Own city." Was not This He Who had once parted the waves hither and thither, and made the dry ground appear at the bottom of the sea, so that His people Israel passed dry-shod between masses of water standing still, as through an hollow glen in a mountain.

R. We have heard of the tribulation of those cities, which they have suffered, and we have fainted. Fear and confusion of mind are fallen upon us. Even the mountains will not give us a refuge.* Lord, have mercy.
V. We have sinned like our forefathers, we have done unjustly, and wrought iniquity.
R. Lord, have mercy.

Reading 10: Was not This He Who made the depths of the sea solid under the feet of Peter, so that the watery path offered a firm way for human footsteps.Therefore then denied He unto Himself a like service from the sea, but crossed over that narrow lake at the cost of a voyage on shipboard " He entered into a ship, and passed over."

Reading 11: What wonder, my brethren Christ came to take our weakness upon Him, that He might n make us partakers of His strength to seek the things of men, that He might give to men the things of God to receive insults, that He might bestow honours to bear weariness, that He might grant rest for the physician that is himself beset by no frailties, knoweth not how to treat the frailties of others, nor he that is not weak with the weak, how to make the weak strong.

Reading 12:Therefore, if Christ had abode still in His strength, He had in no wise been a fellow of men if in Him Flesh had not run the way of flesh, then had it been idle for Him to have taken Flesh at all. " He entered into a ship, and passed over, and came into His Own city." The Lord, the Maker of the world, and of all things that are therein, having been pleased for our sakes to prison Himself in our flesh, began to have an human home, and to be a citizen of a Jewish city Himself the Father of all, to have parents and all, that His love might invite, His charity draw, His tenderness bind, His gentleness persuade them whom His Kingship had scared, His awfulness scattered, and His power terrified out of His dominion.

R. One Seraph cried unto another * Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts the whole earth is full of His glory.
V. There are Three That bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost and these Three are One.
R. Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.


R. The whole earth is full of His glory.





Gospel: Matthew 9:1-8

AND entering into a boat, he passed over the water and came into his own city. And behold they brought to him one sick of the palsy lying in a bed. And Jesus, seeing their faith, said to the man sick of the palsy: Be of good heart, son, thy sins are forgiven thee.  And behold some of the scribes said within themselves: He blasphemeth.  And Jesus seeing their thoughts, said: Why do you think evil in your hearts? Whether is easier, to say, Thy sins are forgiven thee: or to say, Arise, and walk?  But that you may know that the Son of man hath power on earth to forgive sins, (then said he to the man sick of palsy,) Arise, take up thy bed, and go into thy house. And he arose, and went into his house. And the multitude seeing it, feared, and glorified God that gave such power to men.

Wednesday, 14 September 2016

Exaltation of Holy Cross



Nocturn I: Numbers 21:1-9

Reading 1: And when king Arad the Chanaanite, who dwelt towards the south, had heard this, to wit, that Israel was come by the way of the spies, he fought against them, and overcoming them carried off their spoils. But Israel binding himself by vow to the Lord, said: It thou wilt deliver this people into my hand, I will utterly destroy their cities.

R. Lo the Church, with solemn gladness, hails the day for ever glorious, when the opening earth revealeth that dread tree of mystic triumph.* On whose boughs her dying Saviour shattered death and crushed the serpent.
V. He the Word of God eternal, on those stately branches hanging, hath for us a new way opened.
R. On whose boughs her dying Saviour shattered death and crushed the serpent.

Reading 2: And the Lord heard the prayers of Israel, and delivered up the Chanaanite, and they cut them off and destroyed their cities: and they called the name of that place Horma, that is to say, Anathema. And they marched from mount Hor, by the way that leadeth to the Red Sea, to compass the land of Edom.

R. Faithful Cross, above all other, one and only noble tree None in foliage, none in blossom, none in fruit thy peers may be* Sweetest wood and sweetest iron, Sweetest weight is hung on thee.
V. Thou art higher than all cedars.
R. Sweetest wood, and sweetest iron, Sweetest weight is hung on thee.

Reading 3: And the people began to be weary of their journey and labour: And speaking against God and Moses, they said: Why didst thou bring us out of Egypt, to die in the wilderness? There is no bread, nor have we any waters: our soul now loatheth this very light food. Wherefore the Lord sent among the people fiery serpents.

R. This is that noble tree, planted in the midst of the garden* Whereon the Author of our salvation did by His Own death openly triumph over the death of all men.
V. Even the Cross, whereof the glory is so excellent, and which the Emperor Heraclius did so eagerly rescue.
R. Whereon the Author of our salvation did by His Own death openly triumph over the death of all men.

Reading 4: The serpents bit them and killed many of them. Upon which they came to Moses, and said: We have sinned, because we have spoken against the Lord and thee: pray that he may take away these serpents from us. And Moses prayed for the people. And the Lord said to him: Make a brazen serpent, and set it up for a sign: whosoever being struck shall look on it, shall live. Moses therefore made a brazen serpent, and set it up for a sign: which when they that were bitten looked upon, they were healed.

(responsory not available online)

Nocturn II

Reading 5: Chosroes of Persia, having, in the last days of the reign of the Emperor Phocas, overrun Egypt and Africa, in 614, took Jerusalem, where he slaughtered thousands of Christians and carried off to Persia the Cross of the Lord, which Helen had put upon Mount Calvary. Heraclius, the successor of Phocas, moved by the thought of the hardships and horrid outrages of war, sought for peace, but Chosroes, drunken with conquest, would not allow of it even upon unfair terms. Heraclius therefore, being set in this uttermost strait, earnestly sought help from God by constant fasting and prayer, and through His good inspiration gathered an army, joined battle with the enemy, and prevailed against three of Chosroes' chief captains, and three armies.

R. But us it behoveth to glory in the Cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, in Whom is our salvation, life, and resurrection * Who hath saved us and redeemed us.
V. O Lord, we worship thy Cross, and make memorial of thy glorious passion.
R. Who hath saved us and redeemed us.

Reading 6: Chosroes was broken by these defeats, and when in his flight, in 628, he was about crossing the Tigris, he proclaimed his son Medarses partner in his kingdom. Chosroes' eldest son Siroes took this slight to heart, and formed a plot to murder his father and brother, which plot he brought to effect soon after they had come home. Then he got the kingdom from Heraclius upon certain terms, whereof the first was that he should give back the Cross of the Lord Christ.

R. The Relique true from heaven revealed, hath now the Gospel's figure sealed
* As by the serpent Moses reared, so by the Cross the sick are healed.
V. When the dead touch the Cross they arise, and the wonderful works of God are made manifest.
R. As by the serpent Moses reared, so by the Cross the sick are healed.

Reading 7: The Cross therefore was received back after that it had been fourteen years in the power of the Persians, and (in 629) Heraclius came to Jerusalem and bore it with solemn pomp unto the Mount whereunto the Saviour had borne it.This event was marked by a famous miracle. Heraclius, who was adorned with gold and jewels, stayed perforce at the gateway which leadeth unto Mount Calvary, and the harder he strove to go forward, the harder he seemed to be held back, whereat both himself and all they that stood by were sore amazed.

R. This Sign of the Cross shall be in heaven, when the Lord cometh to judgment.* Then shall the secrets of our hearts be made manifest.
V. When the Son of Man shall sit in the throne of His glory, and shall begin to judge the world by fire.
R. Then shall the secrets of our hearts be made manifest.

Reading 8:Then spake Zacharias, Patriarch of Jerusalem, saying: See, O Emperor, that it be not that in carrying the Cross attired in the guise of a Conqueror thou showest too little of the poverty and lowliness of Jesus Christ. Then Heraclius cast away his princely raiment and took off his shoes from his feet, and in the garb of a countryman easily finished his journey, and set up the Cross once more in the same place upon Calvary whence the Persians had carried it away. That the Cross had been put by Heraclius in the same place wherein it had first been planted by the Saviour caused the yearly Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross to become the more famous thenceforward.


Nocturn III (Pope St Leo the Great)

Reading 9: Dearly beloved brethren, when we gaze upon Christ lifted up upon the Cross, the eyes of our mind see more than that which appeared before the wicked, unto whom it was said through Moses: And thy life shall hang in doubt before thee, and thou shalt fear day and night, and shalt have none assurance of thy life. They saw in the crucified Lord nothing but the work of their own wickedness, and they feared greatly, not with that faith which giveth earnest of life by justification, but with that whereby the evil conscience is tortured.

R. Sweetest wood and sweetest iron, Sweetest weight is hung on thee
* Thou alone wast counted worthy this world's ransom to uphold.
V. The sign of the Cross shall be in heaven when the Lord cometh to judgment.
R. Thou alone wast counted worthy this world's ransom to uphold.

Reading 10: But our understanding is enlightened by the Spirit of truth, and with pure and open hearts we see the glory of the Cross shining over heaven and earth, and discern by inward glance what the Lord meant when His Passion was nigh at hand, and He said Now is the judgment of this world, now shall the prince of this world be cast out. And I, if I be lifted up from the earth, will draw all things unto Me. How wonderful is the power of the Cross! O how unutterable is the glory of the Passion, wherein standeth the Lord's judgment - seat, and the judgment of this world, and the might of the Crucified! Lord! Thou hast drawn all things unto thee! Thou didst spread out thine Hands all the day unto an unbelieving and gainsaying people, but the world hath felt and owned thy Majesty! Lord!

R. As Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son of Man be lifted up
* That whosoever believeth in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life.
V. God sent not His Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world through Him might be saved.
R. That whosoever believeth in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

Reading 11: Thou hast drawn all things unto thee! All the elements gave one wild cry of horror at the iniquity of the Jews the lights of the firmament were darkened, day turned into night, earth quaked with strange tremblings, and all God's work refused to serve the guilty. Lord! Thou hast drawn all things unto thee! The veil of the Temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom, the Holy of Holies denied itself as a Sanctuary for the ministration of unworthy Priests, that the shadow might be changed for the substance, prophecy for realization, and the Law for the Gospel.

Reading 12: Lord! Thou hast drawn all things unto thee! That which was veiled under types and shadows in the one Jewish Temple, is hailed by the love of all peoples in full and open worship. There is now a higher order of Levites, a more honourable rank of elders, a Priesthood with an holier anointing. thy Cross is a well of blessings for all, and a cause of thanksgiving for all. Thereby for them that believe in thee, weakness is turned into strength, shame into glory, and death into life. The changing ordinance of divers carnal sacrifices is gone; the one oblation of thy Body and Blood fulfilleth them all. For Thou art the Very Paschal Lamb, Which takest away the sins of the world, and art in thyself all offerings finished. And even as Thou art the One Sacrifice Which taketh the place of all sacrifices, so may thy kingdom be one kingdom established over all peoples.

Gospel: St John 12: 31-36:

Sentence is now being passed on this world; now is the time when the prince of this world is to be cast out. Yes, if only I am lifted up from the earth, I will attract all men to myself.  (In saying this, he prophesied the death he was to die.The multitude answered him, We have been told, out of the law, that Christ is to remain undisturbed for ever; what dost thou mean by saying that the Son of Man must be lifted up? What Son of Man is this?  And Jesus said to them, The light is among you still, but only for a short time. Finish your journey while you still have the light, for fear darkness should overtake you; he who journeys in darkness cannot tell which way he is going.  While you still have the light, have faith in the light, that so you may become children of the light. So much Jesus told them, and then went away, and was lost to their view.

Saturday, 10 September 2016

Matins readings for the second Sunday of September



Nocturn I: Job 9:1-17

Reading 1: And Job answered, and said: Indeed I know it is so, and that man cannot be justified compared with If he will contend with him, he cannot answer him one for a thousand. He is wise in heart, and mighty in strength: who hath resisted him, and hath had peace Who hath removed mountains, and they whom he overthrew in his wrath, knew it not.

R. What shall we receive good at the hand of God, and shall we not receive evil?
* The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away. As the Lord hath pleased, so hath it befallen. Blessed be the Name of the Lord.
V. Naked came I out of my mother's womb, and naked shall I return thither.
R. The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away. As the Lord hath pleased, so hath it befallen. Blessed be the Name of the Lord.

Reading 2: Who shaketh the earth out of her place, and the pillars thereof tremble. Who commandeth tile sun and it riseth not: and shutteth up the stars as it were under a seal:Who alone spreadeth out the heavens, and walketh upon the waves of the sea. Who maketh Arcturus, and Orion, and Hyades, and the inner parts of the south.

R. My sighing cometh before I eat, and my roarings are poured out like the waters, for the thing which I greatly feared is come upon me, and that which I was afraid of is come unto me. Was not I silent Held not I my peace Was not I at rest* And trouble came.
V. Behold, I cannot help myself, and they that were needful unto me have forsaken me.
R. And trouble came.

Reading 3: Who doth things great and incomprehensible, and wonderful, of which there is no number.  If he come to me, I shall not see him: if he depart I shall not understand. If he examine on a sudden, who shall answer him? or who can say: Why dost thou so? God, whose wrath no mall can resist, and under whom they stoop that bear up the world.

R. Why do ye argue against the words of truth? Do ye imagine words to reprove me and strive to confound one that is your friend* Nevertheless, finish that ye have in mind.
V. Judge that which is just, and ye shall find no iniquity in my tongue.
R. Nevertheless, finish that ye have in mind.

Reading 4: What am I then, that I should answer him, and have words with him? I, who although I should have any just thing, would not answer, but would make supplication to my judge. And if he should hear me when I call, I should not believe that he had heard my voice.  For he shall crush me in a whirlwind, and multiply my wounds even without cause.

R. My harp is turned to mourning, and my organ into the voice of them that weep.* Let me alone, O Lord, for my days are vanity.
V. My skin is black upon me, and my bones are burned with heat.
R. Let me alone, O Lord, for my days are vanity.
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. Let me alone, O Lord, for my days are vanity.

Nocturn II: St Gregory, Book of Morals

Reading 5: We know that it is so of a truth, and that a man cannot be justified as against God. When God is put out of the consideration, a man may be considered to be just, but considered as against God, his righteousness vanisheth away. When a man measureth himself by his relation to Him, Who is the Author of all good, he doth thereby acknowledge that of himself he hath no good in him, but hath received from God whatsoever he hath. He that glorifieth himself because of good which hath been given him, fighteth against God with God's own gifts. It is just therefore that the grounds upon which he ought to have been humbled, but upon which he hath puffed himself up, should be used to humble his vain-glory.

R. My flesh is clothed with worms and clods of dust. My skin is dry and drawn together.
* Remember me, O Lord, for my life is wind.
V. My days are swifter than a weaver's shuttle, and are spent without hope.
R. Remember me, Lord, for my life is wind.

Reading 6: But an holy man, because he perceiveth that the worth of our own good deeds falleth short, when he considereth his own spiritual man, justly saith If He will contend with him, he cannot answer Him one of a thousand.

R. My days are few, and in a short while they will be ended. Let me alone, then, O Lord that I may bewail my sorrow a little
* Before I go to the land of darkness and of the shadow of death.
V. thine hands, O Lord have made me, and fashioned me together round about, and yet dost Thou forthwith destroy me
R. Before I go to the land of darkness and of the shadow of death.

Reading 7: In the Holy Scriptures the numeral a thousand is used to be taken as signifying a generalization. Thus, the Psalmist saith The word which He commanded to a thousand generations, whereas it is notorious that the Evangelist doth not reckon more then seventy-and-seven generations between the very beginning of the world and the coming of our Redeemer. What therefore is to be understood here by a thousand. The general ripeness of the old generation to bring forth a new offspring. Hence also it is said by John And shall reign with Him a thousand years, because the reign of the Holy Church will be over all mankind made perfect.

R. Hide not thy face from me, O Lord Withdraw not thine hand far from me
* And let not thy dread make me afraid.
V. O Lord, correct me but in mercy not in thine anger, lest Thou bring me to nothing.
R. And let not thy dread make me afraid.

Reading 8: When times one is ten, and ten times ten is an hundred, and ten times an hundred is a thousand. Observing therefore this connection between one and a thousand, what are we to understand by the one (in the text, connected as it is with the thousand whereby we understand perfection)? Is it not the beginning of a good life, even as the thousand representeth perfection? The contending with God (which is spoken of in the text) is the nonacknowledgment of that which is owed to Him, and the vain-glorying instead in our own strength. But an holy man should see, that even if one had received the gifts of perfection, and were to make them the grounds of self-glorifying, such an one would thereby lose all that he had received.

R. O that my sins, whereby I have deserved wrath* And the calamity whereunder I suffer, were laid in the balances together.
V. For now it would appear heavier than the sand of the sea, therefore also my words are full of sorrow.
R. And the calamity, whereunder I suffer, were laid in the balances together.
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. And the calamity, whereunder I suffer, were laid in the balances together.

Matins readings for the Seventeenth Sunday after Pentecost (Nocturn III and Gospel)



Nocturn III (Sermon 72 of St John Chrysostom on Matthew)

Reading 9: At that time, the Pharisees came unto Jesus, and one of them, which was a lawyer, asked Him a question, tempting Him, saying: Master, which is the great commandment in the Law? And so on.

When the Pharisees had heard that Christ had put the Sadducees to silence, they gathered themselves together for a fresh attack just when it behoved them to be quiet, they willed to contend and so they put forward one of themselves who professed skill in the law, not wishing to learn, but to lay a snare. This person therefore proposed the question: "Which is the great commandment in the law?” The first and great commandment is: "Thou shalt love the Lord thy God," but they expected that He would make some exception or addition to this in His Own case, since He made Himself God.  With this expectation they asked Him the question.

R. O that Thou wouldest hide me in the grave; that Thou wouldest keep me secret, until thy wrath be past, even thine, O Lord, Thou That alone art God;
* That Thou wouldest appoint me a set time, and remember me!
V. Are thy days as the days of man, that Thou inquirest after mine iniquity, and there is none that can deliver out of thine hand.
R. That Thou wouldest appoint me a set time, and remember me!

Reading 10: But what said Christ? To show that they had adopted this course, because they were loveless, and sick with envy, He answered: "Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like unto it: "Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself."

Responsory (cantus database)

Reading 11: Why is this second commandment like unto the first Because the first is the second's source and sanction. "For every one that doeth evil hateth the light, neither cometh to the light." John iii. 20. And again: "The fool hath said in his heart There is no God" and there followeth: "They are corrupt, and become abominable in their works."  And yet again: "The love of money is the root of all evil which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith." And yet once more: "If ye love Me, keep My commandments,", of which commandments the head and root is "Thou shalt love the Lord thy God and thy neighbour as thyself."

Responsory

Reading 12: If therefore, to love God is to love our neighbour also, as it appeared, where it is written: "Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou Me? And he said unto Him: 'Lord, Thou knowest all things, Thou knowest that I love thee.' Jesus saith unto him: 'Feed My sheep',", and if "love is the fulfilling of the law,", justly doth the Lord say that "on these two commandments hang all the law and the Prophets." And even as when, before this, being interrogated about the Resurrection, He answered them more than they asked, so, now, being interrogated concerning the first and great commandment, He answereth them, of His own accord, touching that second one also, which is little lower than the first, for "the second is like unto it." Herein He would have them understand that it was hatred stirred them up to question Him. For "Charity," saith the Apostle, "envieth not."

R. One Seraph cried unto another * Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts the whole earth is full of His glory.
V. There are Three That bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost and these Three are One.
R. Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. The whole earth is full of His glory.

Gospel: Matt 22:34-46

But the Pharisees hearing that he had silenced the Sadducees, came together.  And one of them, a doctor of the law, asking him, tempting him: Master, which is the greatest commandment in the law?

Jesus said to him: Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with thy whole heart, and with thy whole soul, and with thy whole mind. This is the greatest and the first commandment. And the second is like to this: Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself. On these two commandments dependeth the whole law and the prophets.

And the Pharisees being gathered together, Jesus asked them, Saying: What think you of Christ? whose son is he?

They say to him: David's.

He saith to them: How then doth David in spirit call him Lord, saying: The Lord said to my Lord, Sit on my right hand, until I make thy enemies thy footstool? If David then call him Lord, how is he his son?

And no man was able to answer him a word; neither durst any man from that day forth ask him any more questions.

Thursday, 8 September 2016

Nativity of the BVM, Class II



Nocturn I: Song of Songs 1:1-16

Reading 1: Let him kiss me with the kiss of his mouth: for thy breasts are better than wine,
Smelling sweet of the best ointments. thy name is as oil poured out: therefore young maidens have loved thee. Draw me: we will run after thee to the odour of thy ointments. The king hath brought me into his storerooms: we will be glad and rejoice in thee, remembering thy breasts more than wine: the righteous love thee.

R. This day was the Blessed Virgin Mary born of the lineage of David.
* The same is she through whom the salvation of the world hath been manifested before the eyes of all believers. This is she whose glorious life hath given light to the world.
V. Let us keep with rejoicing the Birth-day of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
R. The same is she through whom the salvation of the world hath been manifested before the eyes of all believers. This is she whose glorious life hath given light to the world.

Reading 2: I am black but beautiful, O ye daughters of Jerusalem, as the tents of Cedar, as the curtains of Solomon. Do not consider me that I am brown, because the sun hath altered my colour: the sons of my mother have fought against me, they have made me the keeper in the vineyards: my vineyard I have not kept. Show me, O thou whom my soul loveth, where thou feedest, where thou liest in the midday, lest I begin to wander after the flocks of thy companions.

R. Let us keep right heartily the Birthday of the Most Blessed Virgin Mary,
* That she may pray for us to our Lord Jesus Christ.
V. Let us keep with right hearty rejoicing the Birthday of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
R. That she may pray for us to our Lord Jesus Christ.

Reading 3: If thou know not thyself, O fairest among women, go forth, and follow after the steps of the flocks, and feed thy kids beside the tents of the shepherds.To my company of horsemen, in Pharao's chariots, have I likened thee, O my love.Thy cheeks are beautiful as the turtledove's, thy neck as jewels.We will make thee chains of gold, inlaid with silver.

R. Let us tell again of the right worthy Birth of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
* The same is she whose lowliness the Lord regarded, she who by the message of an Angel conceived the Saviour of the world.
V. Let us keep right earnestly the Birth-day of the most Blessed Virgin Mary.
R. The same is she whose lowliness the Lord regarded, she who by the message of an Angel conceived the Saviour of the world.

Reading 4: While the king was at his repose, my spikenard sent forth the odour thereof. A bundle of myrrh is my beloved to me, he shall abide between my breasts. A cluster of cypress my love is to me, in the vineyards of Engaddi. Behold thou art fair, O my love, behold thou art fair, thy eyes are as those of doves. Behold thou art fair, my beloved, and comely. Our bed is flourishing. The beams of our houses are of cedar, our rafters of cypress trees.

Nocturn II: Sermon of St Bernard (On the praises of the Virgin Mary 2:II, 17)

Not available online

Nocturn III: Sermon of St Jerome

Reading 9: From the Holy Gospel according to Matthew,  The Book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the Son of David, the son of Abraham. Abraham begat Isaac, and Isaac begat Jacob. And so on.

In Isaiah we read: "Who shall declare His generation?" Let us not think that there is any contradiction between the Prophet and the Evangelist, because the Prophet saith that this thing cannot be done, and the Evangelist beginneth by doing it. The one speaketh of the generation of the Divine (Word by the Eternal Father,) the other of the (family in which the) Incarnation (took place.) Matthew beginneth with carnal things, that by learning of men we may go on to learn of God. pedigree properly.

R. All generations shall call me blessed,
* For the Lord that is mighty hath magnified me, and holy is his Name.
V. And his mercy is on them that fear him throughout all generations.
R. For the Lord that is mighty hath magnified me, and holy is his Name.

Reading 10: "The Son of David, the son of Abraham." The reversal of the order in these clauses is a needful change. If Abraham had been put first and David afterwards, Abraham would have had to be taken again, in order to marshal the the pedigree properly.

R. Blessed are thou, O holy Virgin Mary, and most worthy of all praise,
* For out of thee arose the Sun of Righteousness, even Christ our God.
V. Pray for the people, plead for the clergy, entreat for all women dedicated to God: let everyone that keepeth holy-day in honour of thy Birthday know the benefit of thine intercession.
R. For out of thee arose the Sun of Righteousness.

Reading 11: Matthew first calleth Christ the Son of these twain Abraham and David without making mention of the others, because unto these twain only was promise of Christ made unto Abraham, where it is said: "In thy seed" that is, in Christ "shall all the nations of the earth be blessed,"  and unto David, in the words "Of the fruit of thy body will I set upon thy throne."

Reading 12: "And Judas begat Phares and Zara of Thamar." It is to be remarked that in the genealogy of the Saviour none of the holy women are named, but those women only are named against whom the Scripture hath to say something amiss. He Who came to save sinners was born of sinners, that He might wash away all sin. Afterwards are named Ruth, who was a Moabitess, and Bathsheba, who had been the wife of Uriah.

Gospel: St Matthew 1:1-16

A record of the ancestry from which Jesus Christ, the son of David, son of Abraham, was born. Abraham was the father of Isaac, Isaac of Jacob, Jacob of Juda and his brethren; Juda of Phares and Zara, by Thamar; Phares of Esron, Esron of Aram, Aram of Aminadab, Aminadab of Naasson, Naasson of Salmon; Salmon of Booz, by Rahab; Booz of Obed, by Ruth; Obed of Jesse; and Jesse was the father of king David. And king David was the father of Solomon, by her that had been the wife of Urias. Solomon was the father of Roboam, Roboam of Abias, Abias of Asa, Asa of Josaphat, Josaphat of Joram, Joram of Ozias, Ozias of Joatham, Joatham of Achaz, Achaz of Ezechias, Ezechias of Manasses, Manasses of Amon, Amon of Josias; and Josias was the father of Jechonias and his brethren, at the time of the removal to Babylon.  And after the removal to Babylon, Jechonias was the father of Salathiel, Salathiel of Zorobabel,  Zorobabel of Abiud, Abiud of Eliacim, Eliacim of Azor, Azor of Sadoc, Sadoc of Achim, Achim of Eliud,  Eliud of Eleazar, Eleazar of Mathan, Mathan of Jacob, and Jacob was the father of Joseph, the husband of Mary; it was of her that Jesus was born, who is called Christ.

Saturday, 3 September 2016

Sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost - Matins readings (Third Nocturn and Gospel)

The Matins readings for the third Nocturn this Sunday are set out below.

Nocturn III (Homily of St Ambrose)

Reading 9: Now is healed this man sick of the dropsy, in whom too much watery matter had well-nigh drowned the functions of life, and quenched the fire of understanding. Anon, a lesson is given in lowly-mindedness, when it is forbidden to the guests at a marriage feast to go and sit down unasked in the highest room, albeit the Lord spake gently, that the teaching of courtesy might forestall a harsh rebuke, reason prevail by dint of persuasion, and the desires be bent to follow the instruction.

R. O that Thou wouldest hide me in the grave; that Thou wouldest keep me secret, until thy wrath be past, even thine, O Lord, Thou That alone art God;* That Thou wouldest appoint me a set time, and remember me!
V. Are thy days as the days of man, that Thou inquirest after mine iniquity, and there is none that can deliver out of thine hand.
R. That Thou wouldest appoint me a set time, and remember me!

Reading 10: And upon this, as next-door neighbour, cometh courtesy, which is so called by the Lord, when it is shown to the poor and weak, since to show it to them from whom we are to receive aught, is but a movement of self-interest.Lastly, as to a soldier that hath served his full time, is apportioned a reward for esteeming lightly of riches so he only can inherit the kingdom of God, whose soul is not given to seek after lower ends, and who purchaseth not to himself earthly possessions whereas the Lord saith "Sell that thou hast, and follow Me."

(responsory not available)

Reading 11: Neither can he gain it that buyeth oxen, which beasts Elisha slew and gave unto the people. Neither can he win it which hath married a wife and therefore cannot come, for " he that is unmarried careth for the things that belong to the Lord, how he may please the Lord but he that is married careth for the things that are of the world, how he may please his wife." Not that this is to be taken for blame of marriage, but only that virginity is the more honourable way, since "the unmarried woman" and the widow "careth for the things of the Lord, that she may be holy both in body and in spirit."

(responsory not available)

Reading 12: But in all fairness, having thus spoken concerning widows, let us betake ourselves again among the married, and join with them in entertaining the opinion which is held by so many, that there are only three classes of men who are shut out from the great supper named in the gospel, which three classes are Heathens, Jews, and Heretics. And therefore it is that the Apostle warneth us that we "walk not as other Gentiles walk," in malice and bitterness, and uncleanness, and covetousness, and so have no entry into the kingdom of Christ, since "no unclean person, nor covetous man, who is an idolater, hath any inheritance in the kingdom of Christ

R. One Seraph cried unto another * Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts the whole earth is full of His glory.
V. There are Three That bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost and these Three are One.
R. Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord God of hosts
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. The whole earth is full of His glory.

Gospel: St Luke 14:1-11:

And it came to pass, when Jesus went into the house of one of the chief of the Pharisees, on the sabbath day, to eat bread, that they watched him. And behold, there was a certain man before him that had the dropsy. And Jesus answering, spoke to the lawyers and Pharisees, saying: Is it lawful to heal on the sabbath day? But they held their peace. But he taking him, healed him, and sent him away. And answering them, he said: Which of you shall have an ass or an ox fall into a pit, and will not immediately draw him out, on the sabbath day?  And they could not answer him to these things. And he spoke a parable also to them that were invited, marking how they chose the first seats at the table, saying to them: When thou art invited to a wedding, sit not down in the first place, lest perhaps one more honourable than thou be invited by him: And he that invited thee and him, come and say to thee, Give this man place: and then thou begin with shame to take the lowest place.  But when thou art invited, go, sit down in the lowest place; that when he who invited thee, cometh, he may say to thee: Friend, go up higher. Then shalt thou have glory before them that sit at table with thee. Because every one that exalteth himself, shall be humbled; and he that humbleth himself, shall be exalted.

Matins readings for the first Sunday of September

The Matins readings for the first Sunday of September in the Benedictine office are set out below.

Nocturn I (Job 1:1-11)

Reading 1: There was a man in the land of Hus, whose name was Job, and that man was simple and upright, and fearing God, and avoiding evil.  And there were born to him seven sons and three daughters.  And his possession was seven thousand sheep, and three thousand camels, and five hundred yoke of oxen, and five hundred she asses, and a family exceeding great: and this man was great among all the people of the east.

R. What shall we receive good at the hand of God, and shall we not receive evil?* The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away. As the Lord hath pleased, so hath it befallen. Blessed be the Name of the Lord.
V. Naked came I out of my mother's womb, and naked shall I return thither.
R. The Lord gave and the Lord hath taken away. As the Lord hath pleased, so hath it befallen. Blessed be the Name of the Lord.

Reading 2: And his sons went, and made a feast by houses every one in his day. And sending they called their three sisters to eat and drink with them.  And when the days of their feasting were gone about, Job sent to them, and sanctified them: and rising up early offered holocausts for every one of them. For he said: Lest perhaps my sons have sinned, and have blessed God in their hearts. So did Job all days.

R. My sighing cometh before I eat, and my roarings are poured out like the waters, for the thing which I greatly feared is come upon me, and that which I was afraid of is come unto me. Was not I silent Held not I my peace Was not I at rest* And trouble came.
V. Behold, I cannot help myself, and they that were needful unto me have forsaken me.
R. And trouble came.

Reading 3: Now on a certain day when the sons of God came to stand before the Lord, Satan also was present among them.  And the Lord said to him: Whence comest thou? And he answered and said: I have gone round about the earth, and walked through it. And the Lord said to him: Hast thou considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a simple and upright man, and fearing God, and avoiding evil?

R. Why do ye argue against the words of truth? Do ye imagine words to reprove me and strive to confound one that is your friend* Nevertheless, finish that ye have in mind.
V. Judge that which is just, and ye shall find no iniquity in my tongue.
R. Nevertheless, finish that ye have in mind.

Reading 4:And Satan answering, said: Doth Job fear God in vain? Hast not thou made a fence for him, and his house, and all his substance round about, blessed the works of his hands, and his possession hath increased on the earth? But stretch forth thy hand a little, and touch all that he hath, and see if he blesseth thee not to thy face.

R. My harp is turned to mourning, and my organ into the voice of them that weep.* Let me alone, O Lord, for my days are vanity.
V. My skin is black upon me, and my bones are burned with heat.
R. Let me alone, O Lord, for my days are vanity.
V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, * and to the Holy Ghost.
R. Let me alone, O Lord, for my days are vanity.

Nocturn II (Book of Morals of St Gregory the Great)

Reading 5:The Holy Scripture is put before the eyes of our mind somewhat after the fashion of a looking-glass, that we may see therein the aspect of our inward man. Therein we see what are our unsightly, and what our comely traits thereby we judge how we are growing, and how far yet we are from fullness of stature. The Holy Scripture telleth of the doings of the Saints, and stirreth up the heart of us weaklings to follow them. While it maketh memorial of their victorious deeds, it strengtheneth our frailty to strive against sin. And so by the words of the Scripture it cometh to pass that the soul trembleth less at the battle, for that she seeth how many times the enemies before her have been beaten by brave men.

R. My flesh is clothed with worms and clods of dust. My skin is dry and drawn together.* Remember me, O Lord, for my life is wind.
V. My days are swifter than a weaver's shuttle, and are spent without hope.
R. Remember me, Lord, for my life is wind.

Reading 6: And some while the Scripture showeth unto us, not only how the Saints fought bravely, but also how they fell, that we may see by the example of the mighty, not only what weapons we must take, if we would conquer, but also what snares we must keep clear of, if we would avoid falling. For example, here is Job on the one hand, waxing nobler under trial, and on the other hand, David, tried, and failing utterly. And so the glory of the great strengtheneth our hope, and the backsliding of the same doth stir us up to be watchful and lowly the one cheering us with gladness, and the other putting us on our guard through fear, so that the soul of him which heareth of these things may by the one gain sure and certain hope, and by the other fearfulness and watchfulness, and so neither be rashly puffed up, nor hopelessly cast down, nor may faint under the weight of dread, forasmuch as she is stirred up to trustfulness by the example of him who triumphed.

R. My days are few, and in a short while they will be ended. Let me alone, then, O Lord, that I may bewail my sorrow a little;
* Before I go to the land of darkness and of the shadow of death.
V. Thine hands, O Lord, have made me, and fashioned me together round about, and yet dost Thou forthwith destroy me.
R. Before I go to the land of darkness and of the shadow of death.

Reading 7: There was a man in the land of Uz, whose name was Job. We are told where this holy man lived, that thereby we may gauge the worth of his bravery. Who knoweth not that Uz is a place in the countries of the Gentiles The Gentile world had been so degraded and corrupted by sin, that they had ceased to know that they had a Maker.

R. Hide not thy face from me, O Lord. Withdraw not thine hand far from me,
* And let not thy dread make me afraid.
V. O Lord, correct me but in mercy not in thine anger, lest Thou bring me to nothing.
R. And let not thy dread make me afraid.

Reading 8:Therefore is it told us where Job dwelt, that it may redound to his praise that he was good in the midst of the wicked. It is not very praiseworthy to be good among the good, but to be good among the bad. For even as it is more grievous to be bad among the good, so is it right praiseworthy to have remained good among the bad.

R. O that my sins, whereby I have deserved wrath
* And the calamity whereunder I suffer, were laid in the balances together.
V. For now it would appear heavier than the sand of the sea, therefore also my words are full of sorrow.
R. And the calamity, whereunder I suffer, were laid in the balances together.